Peg shows impact of poverty in Winnipeg

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A new Peg report shows poverty triples the chances of dying in Winnipeg before 75, while the life-expectancy gap between highest and lowest incomes is almost 20 years.

The report – Our City: A Peg Report on Health Equity – is highlighted and linked to from Peg’s  Facebook page and Twitter account.

It shines a light on 11 indicators that show gaps in health based upon income and other social circumstance existing in 12 Winnipeg community areas and 25 neighbourhood clusters. In the lowest income cluster area in Point Douglas the life-expectancy gaps for men and women are 18 and 19 years respectively in comparison to higher-income areas.

An overview of the report indicator information shows gaps related to health, and change trends, between the highest and lowest income areas in Winnipeg.

An overview of the report indicator information shows gaps related to health, and change trends, between the highest and lowest income areas in Winnipeg.

“Disadvantage profoundly limits opportunities to be healthy. This is about much more than individual health choices,” said Dr. Sande Harlos, Medical Officer of Health with the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, in a news release.

Life-expectancy gaps of 18 years for men and 19 years for women exist between the high and low income levels among 25 neighbourhood clusters.

Life-expectancy gaps of 18 years for men and 19 years for women exist between the high and low income levels among 25 neighbourhood clusters.

The report, echoing the experiences of those working in health and social services, highlights that addressing these gaps will require the involvement of all aspects of our community – including business, government, non-profits, and other groups.

“It is concerning to see such significant health inequity in our city – and in some cases, to see inequity growing. By working together, we can change this picture”, said Connie Walker, President and CEO of United Way Winnipeg.

“Peg clearly continues to be a crucial tool for Winnipeggers to understand some of the inequities that exist in our city,” said Scott Vaughan, President and CEO of the International Institute for Sustainable Development. “These sobering findings are an urgent call for collaborative action.”

The report, Our City: A Peg Report on Health Equity, was developed in partnership with the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority.

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Peg, an accessible and interactive community indicator system that measures the health of our communities year after year, can be found online at mypeg.ca.

 

Peg releases annual well-being report; Winnipeg improving in many key areas.

Peg releases Our City: A Peg report on Winnipeg's well being.

Today Peg released its first annual Winnipeg well-being report, Our City: A Peg report on Winnipeg’s well-being (PDF).

It outlines how we’re doing on 16 key indicators, and the good news is Winnipeg is improving on the majority.

Peg Winnipeg Well-Being Overview

Winnipeggers have been making many improvements, from increased high school graduation rates and more disposable income to environmental successes like using less water, recycling more and more rides on the bus.

Areas where Winnipeg is declining include rate of children in care, the condition of our dwellings, lower voter turnout, less volunteerism and escalating diabetes.

There’s been no change in readiness to learn—the skills children need upon entering kindergarten that go a long way towards future success. Up to 40% of Winnipeg children are entering school not ready to be thereImproving readiness to learn is one of the goals of our involvement in the Early Childhood Development Innovation Fund.

While caring about our city is important, caring alone is not enough to make change. It’s also important to measure and report on how we are doing.

Measuring and reporting on economic, social and environmental issues can help us rally and work together toward an even stronger Winnipeg. Measurement encourages us to ask questions, to seek innovation, to drive results, and to celebrate progress.